Isaac Scientific Publishing
Geosciences Research
GR > Volume 1, Number 1, November 2016

Investigation and Quantification of Water Track Networks in Boreal Regions of Alaska

Download PDF  (1698.4 KB)PP. 7-23,  Pub. Date:December 29, 2016
DOI: 10.22606/gr.2016.11002

Author(s)
Mendbayar Uyanga, Misra Debasmita, Gupta Tushar, Ghosh Tathagata
Affiliation(s)
Department of Mining and Geological Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States; Department of Mining and Geological Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States; Department of Mining and Geological Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States; Department of Mining and Geological Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States
Abstract
Water tracks are the dominant drainage pathways that route water through the soil over permafrost in polar environments. Despite their important role in polar ecosystems, water tracks remain relatively unexplored, and the existing studies have been largely confined to tundra areas devoid of vegetation. This study aims to initiate the investigation of water tracks in thickly vegetated subarctic borealis, with objectives to: 1) characterize different types of water tracks in the subarctic; 2) develop methods for mapping water track distribution in boreal areas; 3) perform preliminary analysis of the geotechnical impacts of water tracks on engineered infrastructure. Two highly-varying water tracks were characterized, and led to different but quite promising insights. Several techniques to map water tracks in the subarctic were attempted. Preliminary analysis of geophysical data correlation was performed to determine geophysical signature of water tracks and to assess their geotechnical implications.
Keywords
Water tracks, drainage network, groundwater, hydraulic properties, remote sensing, infrastructure, Alaska, boreal region, subarctic, subsidence, sinkhole, climate change, impacts of climate change.
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